2008
07.11

Quick as ever, Camban read AND reviewed Brute Force! He send me his review of Seven Troop a while back but I had not posted it yet *blush*, sorry Cam. Here both are!

Andy McNab Seven Troop
Seven Troop Review: Undeniably important, compulsive reading for the McNab fan, but I was left with mixed feelings. An enjoyable book in its own right but if you have read B20 and IA, plus those books by ‘Nish’ Bruce, ‘The Bishop’, Gaz Hunter, Cameron Spence, et al, there is little new here in terms of factual events, although we do learn much more about Andy’s feelings and relationships with his comrades in arms. It has to be said that he is either still holding back on some ops, or, he didn’t do many. The NI stuff is good though, if only a variation on the similar experiences of other writers; Duncan Falconer for example, or the few 14 Int/Det writers who have published their stories. So, not disappointing at all, but also not ‘explosive’ as the daft cover blurb would have us believe. Just hope there is more to come.

Andy McNab book Brute ForceBrute Force Review: Tour de Force! As fresh, interesting, and authentic as ever. One for the faithful too with lots of references to the earlier books and the return of Colonel Lynn. Plenty of gritty wit and funny asides as always but with more in depth geographical and historical content than usual; quite a lot to be learned here about the lost archeology of the middle east and the times of the Roman occupation of that region. Skillful intertwining of old enemies, Libya and the IRA. Satisfaction guaranteed. 

Can’t wait to start reading Brute Force too Cam, thanks a lot!!

2008
06.11

Andy McNab in Zoo Today!An article in Zoo Today! where Andy describes how you – if you cannot run – (might) survive under attack of a knife.

Unfortunately it’s lacking the one brilliant advice to ‘carry Andy around in your handbag’ so I’m afraid under attack I just have to give away my purse, or my body and soul if I have to, but then there is a slideshow to guide the guide – so it was a bit hard to focus on the text.

McNab On Surviving A Knife Attack

With knife crime a national epidemic, new statistics show British city-dwellers now stand more chance of being stabbed or robbed at knifepoint than being killed or seriously injured in a road accident.

That’s why ZOO enlisted the help of ex-SAS soldier Andy McNab to find out exactly what you should do if you ever come under attack from a knife-wielding hoodie.

Having walked out of countless precarious situations in Northern Ireland and Iraq, Mr McNab knows a thing or two about hand-to-hand combat, and the first thing he tells us is to forget everything we think TV has taught us about knife attacks.

According to McNab, the way action is portrayed on TV is totally out of touch with reality – and copying the movies is precisely what will get you hurt.

“It’s all bullshit,” Andy says. “In the street, it’s all about avoidance. No matter how well trained you are in martial arts or how hard you might think you are, you run the risk of losing if you get into a knife fight. And with knives, that could mean death.”

So, the best way to survive a knife attack is simply to stay clear.

Read the full article here

Well… think I’m pretty much up-to-date with the posts now, but I’m sure if I look hard enough there’s more to find. So for the moment I’m nót gonna look too hard.

Things are great for us – We just got our Exclusive Interview with Andy, I just got sent a signed announcement poster of the National Army Museum where Andy was guest speaker, Thank you Florence!!
And Jon is getting his copy of the new Nick Stone “Brute Force” from Transworld this year. Big surprise, excellent!! I’m expecting a review soon Jon!

Hope you all enjoy the reads, seeya soon!

2008
06.11

An interview in The Telegraph – by Sarah Ewing.

The secretive and dangerous work of the Special Air Service (SAS) has been brought to the attention of a wider public by bestselling author Andy McNab. He was the most highly decorated serving soldier in the British Army when he left in 1993. He now lives on a farm in Middlesex with his daughter and wife, Jenny.

How did your childhood influence your attitude to money?
It had a huge impact on me. I was found abandoned in a carrier bag outside Guy’s Hospital in London in 1959, and was brought up by my foster parents, who later adopted me. They were decent working-class people, but money was always very tight, because they also adopted another boy and had their own young son. In the 1970s we relied on free school dinners and clothes vouchers. Money was always a concern.

Does being well off now make you feel happier?
No, not exactly. Many people believe the cliché “Money can’t buy you happiness”. But it does, you know. You don’t have to worry about things, like my mum and dad did, and whether you’ve got enough money in the bank to cover bills. However, I don’t travel first class out of principle – I go business class. I can’t see the point of spending an extra four grand.

Does talking about personal wealth embarrass you?
No. I’ve spent a lot of time in New York and people there are the complete opposite of Brits, where there’s almost an embarrassment about doing well for yourself and having money. In the early days when my writing career took off, there was a funny reaction amongst my friends; some were p****d off, some were happy for me.

Go here to read the full interview in The Telegraph

2008
06.11

Ray Bennett wrote this for Cue Entertainment, but I will link to his own blog:

Warrior/author McNab loves a good story, like Mamma Mia
November 3rd, 2008

By Ray Bennett

LONDON — Things you might know about Andy McNab: He was a highly decorated SAS soldier; he wrote the bestselling “Bravo Two Zero” about his time in combat in the Gulf War; and he writes action thrillers.

Things you might not know about Andy McNab: He is happily married; he loves films like “Mamma Mia!” and “Little Miss Sunshine”; and he enjoys watching Fox News because it makes him laugh.

McNab (a pseudonym required for security reasons) became famous as a soldier but today he prefers to think of himself as a storyteller. The former SAS man retired in 1993 and now he writes action thrillers with a new one, titled “Brute Force”, due from Transworld Publishers on Nov. 6.

But before that, today in fact, comes a new two-disc DVD titled “Andy McNab’s Tour of Duty” in which the former warrior goes back to the battlefront to tell real-life tales about what it’s like to face the enemy.

Read the full article here

2008
06.11

TheDetour offers the chance to win the “Tour of Duty” DVD, by just submitting your name and e-mail address. No idea how long this will run. Also ‘for UK residents only’ (I’m not, that sucks) and ‘only open to people aged 18 or over’ (I am, that sucks) 😉

Go here to enter the competition on thedetour site

2008
06.11

Female First (also Male First) Helen Earnshaw interviewed Andy who’s ‘on tour’ promoting the release of the ‘Tour of Duty’ DVD.

Andy McNab is a British soldier, serving in the infantry as a Royal Green Jacket, joining the infantry at the age of sixteen and serving in Northern Ireland before being selected for the SAS.

In the SAS he served in the Middle East as well as Southern and Central America. He shot to prominence in 1993 when, after leaving the SAS, he wrote a book on the failed mission Bravo Two Zero, which told of the events that happened during the Gulf War.

Since then he has gone on to write a series of fiction and non fiction novels and has, more recently, been behind the documentary Tour of Duty which looked at the soldiers serving in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. I caught up with him to talk about his new project.

You are promoting your DVD Tour of Duty can you tell me a bit about it?

“For the past three or four years all the stories that are coming out of Iraq and Afghanistan it’s always someone else telling the stories, so the idea is to get the guys that were involved in these things to talk about it themselves. Instead of me sitting there all day gobbing off about it, lets get these lads in as they know the story well, they are articulate and actually what happens is you get all the emotion and you can identify with them.”

Read the full interview here (2 pages!)