2008
11.06

An interview in The Telegraph – by Sarah Ewing.

The secretive and dangerous work of the Special Air Service (SAS) has been brought to the attention of a wider public by bestselling author Andy McNab. He was the most highly decorated serving soldier in the British Army when he left in 1993. He now lives on a farm in Middlesex with his daughter and wife, Jenny.

How did your childhood influence your attitude to money?
It had a huge impact on me. I was found abandoned in a carrier bag outside Guy’s Hospital in London in 1959, and was brought up by my foster parents, who later adopted me. They were decent working-class people, but money was always very tight, because they also adopted another boy and had their own young son. In the 1970s we relied on free school dinners and clothes vouchers. Money was always a concern.

Does being well off now make you feel happier?
No, not exactly. Many people believe the cliché “Money can’t buy you happiness”. But it does, you know. You don’t have to worry about things, like my mum and dad did, and whether you’ve got enough money in the bank to cover bills. However, I don’t travel first class out of principle – I go business class. I can’t see the point of spending an extra four grand.

Does talking about personal wealth embarrass you?
No. I’ve spent a lot of time in New York and people there are the complete opposite of Brits, where there’s almost an embarrassment about doing well for yourself and having money. In the early days when my writing career took off, there was a funny reaction amongst my friends; some were p****d off, some were happy for me.

Go here to read the full interview in The Telegraph

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