2011
22.07

The Sun
By Viginia Wheeler, Defence Editor
02 Jul 2011

The injured soldier cried in pain and collapsed in the compound of the British Army’s Middle East HQ in Cairo.
Second Lieutenant Archibald David Stirling had perilously scaled an internal fence using his crutches as a ladder.
But sentries had been alerted and were hunting him down with rifles raised.
With seconds to spare he forced his way into the office of General Ritchie and delivered a daring proposal.

Stirling, the son of a Scottish laird, had hatched a plan with pal Jock Lewes to form a revolutionary new force of raiders who would operate deep behind enemy lines to destroy aircraft, gain intelligence and attack supply lines.
Instead of sending Stirling to prison for breaking in to the HQ, Army bosses liked the idea.

He and Lewes created their gang of “misfits, rogues and rule-breakers” exactly 70 years ago this week. They took as their motto “Who Dares Wins” and became known as the Special Air Service, or SAS.

The regiment has never been busier than it is today in Afghanistan.
New figures gathered by The Sun show the recent heroics played out against the Taliban behind enemy lines in Helmand.

However, the regiment’s most secretive mission is yet to come.

The family of Lieut Jock Lewes – dubbed “The Godfather Of The SAS” – has revealed a cloak-and-dagger operation to recover the hero’s remains from the Libyan desert where the regiment first worked.

Go here to read the full article in The Sun

myView
By ANDY McNAB

“Who Dares Wins” is a way of life for the regiment. It is living and breathing this motto that makes the SAS the best at what they do.

It is not only the harsh training of SAS troopers that results in the best. It is also how these troopers operate in battle that sets them apart from other special forces.

The SAS know that the most effective weapon in war isn’t weapons – but information on what the enemy is planning.

In Afghanistan today, one of the most important jobs the SAS do is risk life and limb gathering intelligence because it is this which will defeat the Taliban and find the factories making IEDs that kill our troops.

Once the SAS have intelligence, they can destroy the enemy where it hurts most, faster and more efficiently than anyone else. That’s where “Who Dares Wins” really matters.

2011
09.07

Andy McNab at the National Army Museum
21 September 2011, 7.00pm

One of Britain’s most famous and controversial soldiers returns to the National Army Museum to voice his views on the current conflict in Afghanistan.

McNab draws on his own experiences and those of serving soldiers to provide powerful insights on the courage and hardships of British service personnel in the current conflict and the way forward.

Ticket Prices
Standard: £10.00Concession: £7.50

Tickets can be purchased in the following ways:
•Telephone: 020 7881 6600
•Online: Use the booking form on this page or visit the Museum Shop
•At the Museum
A concessionary rate is available to SOFNAM members, students, seniors and service personnel.

Go here for more information

2011
08.07

The Sun
Harry ‘hunted and tortured’ in drill
Warrior Prince’s practice for being shot down

Published: 17 Jun 2011

PRINCE Harry will head back to war against the Taliban after SAS training that will see him hunted down – and TORTURED.
The Apache helicopter pilot, 26 – who The Sun revealed yesterday is returning to Afghanistan – faces three days of hell learning to cope with being shot down behind enemy lines.

Go here to read the full article in The Sun

myView
By Andy McNab
Sun Security Expert

If things go pear-shaped and Harry loses his aircraft he needs to become a soldier who is equally effective on the ground.

The “escape and evasion” training is rehearsed as realistically as possible.

When I did mine it was the hardest in my whole military career. But it prepares you for what’s coming – and make no mistake, Harry will be roughing it like the rest.

2011
23.04

Amid battle scenes that have been described by one commander as the most
intense “since the Korean War,” the BBC’s Alastair Leithead, award-winning
cameraman Fred Scott and field producer Peter Emmerson spent nine days with
U.K. forces in a remote area of southern Afghanistan. There they found
themselves under the constant risk of ambush and attack.

This past fall, as the BBC team was embedded with the troops, the struggle
intensified between British troops and the forces of the Taliban. Around 5,800
U.K. troops are stationed in Afghanistan, following the U.S.-led invasion in
October 2001, and to date more than 40 have been killed. The majority of the
deployment is in Helmand, an area of major Taliban activity and opium
production.

The filmmakers gained unique, prolonged access to the soldiers of the Royal
Marines 3 Commando Brigade as they fought a shifting and elusive Taliban
threat. Every day, the fighting continues to destroy buildings and lives-
forcing people from their homes. Battlefield Afghanistan is a daring film that
takes viewers directly to the frontlines and questions whether the NATO forces
are losing the battle for the hearts and minds of the Afghan people.

2011
05.02

2010
08.12

‘Afghanada’ is an award-winning Canadian radio drama series, airing on CBC Radio One and Sirius Satellite Radio. CBC is currently broadcasting the show’s fifth season.
I’ve become kind of ‘addicted’ to it, it’s really really good! Like the audio stories Andy McNab produced, it’s with all the sounds and although you don’t see images, it’s like you’re there. It also got a very human approach and once you get to know the characters you feel you live through the events with them. Highly recommended and the shows are available on iTunes!

About The Show:
Created by Greg Nelson, Adam Pettle, Andrew Moodie and Jason Sherman.

“Afghanada gives us a grunts-eye perspective of the war in Afghanistan.  3 -1 Bravo is a Canadian Forces light infantry section fighting with NATO forces deep in the heart of the conflict.  Every day, Sgt. Pat Kinsella (Jenny Young), Private Dean Donaldson (Paul Fauteux) and Private Lucas Manson (Billy Maclellan), confront the chaos and violence of life ‘outside the wire’.

Based on actual events on the ground in Kandahar, each week’s episode takes the listener on an intense and compelling auditory journey, an unadorned reflection of the very real life and death situations Canadian soldiers face every day in Afghanistan.”

For more information on the show go to the Afghanada website