2012
29.05

The sequel to the bestselling novel War Torn will be published in July (according to Amazon)…

Writing with Kym Jordan, Andy McNab has created a stunning sequel to his bestselling novel War Torn which detailed the lives of a close-knit team of soldiers fighting on the frontline in Helmand Province, Afghanistan, and those of their loved ones left behind at base in England.

Like its predecessor, Battle Lines is at once a gritty, close-to-the-action, present day thriller and an involving look at the stresses and strains which divided families and relationships suffer when separated by thousands of miles and a wealth of experience.

This is real life, brought brilliantly to life, by Andy McNab, whose continued involvement with the men and women of the British Army gives this extraordinary novel its authenticity, its toughness and its heart.

Hardcover: 480 pages
Publisher: Bantam Press (19 July 2012)
Language English
ISBN-10: 0593065271
ISBN-13: 978-0593065273

2012
17.05

This is one from last year, but I just remembered looking for it… From the National Army Museum:

War Horse Remembrance

Budding artists of all ages and abilities have been picking up their colouring pencils and exercising their imaginations as part of the National Army Museum’s War Horse: Fact & Fiction exhibition.

Visitors are invited to decorate and name paper horses in commemoration of the millions of horses enlisted by the British Army whose names and deeds have now been forgotten. These colourful and creative paper horses are displayed for all to see on the exhibition’s Remembrance Wall.

'A very vibrant-green-coloured ‘Sgt Green’ by Andy McNab, author and ex-Special Forces soldier'

 

Source: National Army Museum website

2012
04.04

The Sun
26 March 2010

SAS legend Andy McNab has told how he almost got blown up on his return to the frontline in Afghanistan.

The Sun security expert was with an infantry patrol which came across a deadly booby-trapped bomb in the centre of a Taliban IED killing zone.

A young soldier with a mine detector spotted the 44lb device and the shout went up: “Stop!”

Andy said: “It was high explosive that would have taken out the patrol, including me. I was only three men behind him. Without doubt he saved our lives — I owe him a few beers back home.”

Bravo Two Zero hero Andy — armed only with a notepad and camera — had been invited to join the patrol by the CO of 2 Rifles, Lieutenant Colonel Bill Wright.

The first soldiers helicoptered into the battle zone were in “contact” with the enemy immediately, killing three insurgents within minutes.

Six IED blasts then rang out one after another and, as Andy’s patrol passed a graveyard Rifleman Kev Cooper, a 20-year-old Londoner, detected the buried bomb.

Andy said: “Kev told me later he got down, gently started to dig out the sand and thought, ‘F***!’. He said he was just doing his job but we’re glad he found it before it took us out and that it’s not still lying there waiting for other lads.”

The mission ended with a total of 44 bombs made safe, two prisoners, a huge haul of explosives and weapons — with NO British casualties.

Source: The Sun

Photo from The Sun UK

 

2011
29.11

At an exhibition exploring the real life war stories that inspired Michael Morpurgo’s hugely popular novel War Horse and the hit stage show that followed it, Camilla unveiled a watercolour she has painted of a horse badly wounded in a terrorist attack.

The Duchess, who paints on days off at the country homes she shares with Prince Charles at Highgrove and Birkhall, presented the National Army Museum in London with her portrait of Sefton, a horse badly wounded in a 1982 IRA nail bomb attack on the Household Cavalry in Hyde Park.

The painting, finished by her at Birkhall last week, went on show with other pictures of old war horses painted on equine-shaped templates by celebrities including Alan Titchmarsh and SAS author Andy McNab on a wall of remembrance..

Source: Express.co.uk

Anyone who can tell us more about Andy’ s piece of Art.. please contact us at lynn@greymansland.com

 

2011
20.09

The Sun
A dark shadow over our Army – Iraq torture death report: Chief slams Brits’ assault

By David Willets, Defence Correspondent
Published: 09 Sep 2011

The sadism of a handful of Brit troops implicated in an Iraqi dad’s death was blasted yesterday as a “dark shadow” over our Army’s proud reputation.

Last night the squaddies involved were waiting to learn if they face charges as their brutality against captives in Basra was laid bare in a sickening dossier.

The report — into the death of innocent father-of-two Baha Mousa — exposed them as savagely out of control as prisoners were put through hell.

Army supremo General Sir Peter Wall said of the high standards expected of our forces: “The shameful circumstances of Baha Mousa’s death have cast a dark shadow on that reputation. This must not happen again.”

Go here to read the full article in The Sun 

MyView
by Andy McNab

“This was an isolated incident where the command and control structure completely broke down.

But don’t judge the rest of the Army on the behaviour of this bunch.

The Army is not a knitting club, we train our men to be aggressive, to fight and to kill.

Their lives depend on it. But that aggression must be controlled.

What happened here was the chain of command did not have a grip on it.

They lost control and the consequences were tragic. But it is an isolated incident. You have to welcome this report, no one is covering up.”

2011
31.08

Squaddie ‘chops off Taliban fingers’ – Scot probed over digits stash

The Sun
By Nick Sharpe, Chief Reporter, and Lynn Davidson
Published: 08 Aug 2011

A Scots squaddie has been accused of slicing off the fingers of dead Taliban fighters.
The soldier, from the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, is under investigation over claims he kept the digits from mutilated corpses in Afghanistan.

A source revealed: “The allegations have rocked the battalion.”

Go here to read the full article in The Sun

‘We need Our Boys aggressive to do job’
myView
By ANDY McNAB

“What we have to remember is that this is not a knitting circle — these lads are trained killers and we need them to be aggressive.

You want the lads to get sparked up, to get excited, because that’s what allows them to do things they would never do in normal life.

In turn, though, the officers who are in charge of them have a huge role to play when situations like this one arise.

They are told in training that they have to ‘grip’ the soldiers — they have to curb their worst excesses as soon as they arise.

This guy should have been quickly sat down and told that what he was doing was out of order.

Whether the officers didn’t know about it or were too weak to stop it doesn’t matter — there has clearly been a failure of the command structure here.

I’ve seen people take ears and fingers from dead enemy.

Generally it was because they wanted a souvenir.

But a few days later they are going to look at it and think ‘What the hell did I do that for?’.

Most likely that is why this guy was doing what he did.

Sometimes it’s the trigger finger of the dead enemy that gets chopped, to send a message to those of them who are left behind.”