2018
11.01

The Sun
10 January 2018

The new army advertising campaign that promotes emotional and physical support for recruits has prompted huge debate over the message it sends out.
Here former SAS sergeant Andy McNab and former First Sea Lord Admiral The Lord West of Spithead wade in to the row.

“If you don’t go out to all the sections of society to recruit, there won’t be a military” ~Andy McNab

“The adverts are a good move. The fact is, they’re opening up to a broader spectrum of potential applicants.

We are having problems recruiting people to the army because it’s not seen as a vocation any more and the bureaucracy of it is so painful that it puts people off.

If people think the military is full of six foot tall, four foot wide heterosexual males, then they’re wrong.

You get people jumping up and down saying it’s an outrage that there are gay people in the army but basically go to any battalion and try to pick the gay guys out, because you can’t – but they’re there. There have always been homosexuals in the army, there will always be great soldiers who are homosexual in the army. I think they’ve been watching too many Sunday afternoon, black and white war films. They exist in society so of course they’ll be in the military.

If you’ve got a gay man who wants to join the army, he now knows he’s welcome to apply. He’ll find out when he gets there if he wants to stay or not, but getting him there in the first place is the real issue.

PTSD and mental health issues are now being recognised as much as a battle space injury like getting shot or blown up and that’s the way it should be.

The adverts address this upfront – they’re being open about it and celebrating it. The campaign is saying, “It’s alright, it’s okay, we’re aware of it and we’re dealing with it, so come on in”. What these adverts do is address the issues for people who might stop going ahead with an application.

There have always been gay guys in battalions. So what? There have always been women in units, carrying the same weapons. The standard of the unit it’s not going to change. What you’re doing is opening up the pool of people to apply. It’s a weird sort of perception people have of the military. The whole black-white, men-woman thing has long disappeared. The senior management were brought up on punk music – they’re not all Colonel Blimps.”

It doesn’t matter what colour you are or what your sexuality is; if you fit the requirements, great, you’re in – now start working. ~Andy McNab

Go here to read the full article in The SUN

2017
20.10

The Sun
20th October 2017
By Mike Ridley

WHO DARES TINS:  SAS hero Andy McNab backs the Sun’s Pounds for Poppies appeal

Andy, who was a sergeant in 22 SAS Regiment and is now a best-selling author, met ex-Royal Marine Commando Harris Tatakis to show why you should back our appeal.

SAS hero Andy McNab believes our Pounds for Poppies appeal deserves top honours.

What a brilliant idea to raise money to help armed forces veterans and their families through hard times.
By dropping an old quid into a collecting box you can help the British Legion help veterans like Harris.

Go to The Sun to read the full article ‘Who Dares Tins’

Photos by Wayne Perry for The Sun:

Photo by Wayne Perry

Photo by Wayne Perry

Photo by Wayne Perry

Photo by Wayne Perry

Photo by Wayne Perry

2015
02.04

2015
30.01

Andy McNab talks about his first ever tour in Ireland.

2015
16.01

Andy McNab talks about one of the most defining moments in any soldiers life.

2012
08.12

The Sun
29 November 2012

Prince Charles praised The Sun’s military awards – the Millies – yesterday as he kicked off this year’s star-studded salute to our boys and girls.
His Royal Highness hosted a tea party at Clarence House for the awards judges, who had the tough task of picking winners from a shortlist of phenomenal nominees voted for by you, our readers.

The Prince — who conceived the Millies idea — hailed the awards, now in their fifth year.

He said: “The Millies is a fantastic occasion which gives us the chance to recognise the work of our Armed Forces in all their many and varied forms and to thank them publicly for all that they do, at home and abroad.

Go here to read the full article about The Millies 2012 in The Sun

Andy McNab said: “The Millies really show what our guys are getting up to all over the world. They deserve a national pat on the back — and that is exactly what the Millies do.”