2012
04.04

BBC Today
27 March 2012

Two British soldiers have been killed in the big British barracks at Lashkar Gah, Helmand province, by an Afghan wearing a military uniform.

An American soldier was killed in a separate attack in eastern Afghanistan by a man believed to be part of a village-level fighting force being fostered by the Americans.

One-in-seven international military fatalities in Afghanistan this year has been caused by Afghan soldiers turning their arms on the men who thought they were comrades.

Author and former SAS officer Andy McNab has just returned from Helmand and told the Today programme’s Sarah Montague that “even the Afghan National Army (ANA) are targets,” pointing out that the brigade commander does not go anywhere without his bodyguard.

Go here to listen to the BBC Today item with Andy McNab

2012
04.04

The Sun
26 March 2010

SAS legend Andy McNab has told how he almost got blown up on his return to the frontline in Afghanistan.

The Sun security expert was with an infantry patrol which came across a deadly booby-trapped bomb in the centre of a Taliban IED killing zone.

A young soldier with a mine detector spotted the 44lb device and the shout went up: “Stop!”

Andy said: “It was high explosive that would have taken out the patrol, including me. I was only three men behind him. Without doubt he saved our lives — I owe him a few beers back home.”

Bravo Two Zero hero Andy — armed only with a notepad and camera — had been invited to join the patrol by the CO of 2 Rifles, Lieutenant Colonel Bill Wright.

The first soldiers helicoptered into the battle zone were in “contact” with the enemy immediately, killing three insurgents within minutes.

Six IED blasts then rang out one after another and, as Andy’s patrol passed a graveyard Rifleman Kev Cooper, a 20-year-old Londoner, detected the buried bomb.

Andy said: “Kev told me later he got down, gently started to dig out the sand and thought, ‘F***!’. He said he was just doing his job but we’re glad he found it before it took us out and that it’s not still lying there waiting for other lads.”

The mission ended with a total of 44 bombs made safe, two prisoners, a huge haul of explosives and weapons — with NO British casualties.

Source: The Sun

Photo from The Sun UK

 

2012
10.02

MMA fighter and paratrooper Jack Marshman22-year-old serving Paratrooper and professional MMA fighter Jack Marshman will compete for the British Association of Mixed Martial Arts promotion’s World Middleweight Championship on 24th March at Birmingham’s National Indoor Arena.
Marshman, who will enter the ring with a perfect 10-0 record, will face champion Tom Watson, whose experience and superior technique will pose a formidable obstacle to the title-hungry soldier. However, as one would expect from a Para, Marshman is known for his toughness, tenacity, and indomitable will, and his growing legion of supporters believe he’s more than up for the challenge.
Andy McNab fans and all who support the forces should make sure not to miss this bout, as it promises to be not only a great fight but likely further proof that the men and women who serve have a fighting spirit worthy of a true champion.

2011
20.09

The Sun
A dark shadow over our Army – Iraq torture death report: Chief slams Brits’ assault

By David Willets, Defence Correspondent
Published: 09 Sep 2011

The sadism of a handful of Brit troops implicated in an Iraqi dad’s death was blasted yesterday as a “dark shadow” over our Army’s proud reputation.

Last night the squaddies involved were waiting to learn if they face charges as their brutality against captives in Basra was laid bare in a sickening dossier.

The report — into the death of innocent father-of-two Baha Mousa — exposed them as savagely out of control as prisoners were put through hell.

Army supremo General Sir Peter Wall said of the high standards expected of our forces: “The shameful circumstances of Baha Mousa’s death have cast a dark shadow on that reputation. This must not happen again.”

Go here to read the full article in The Sun 

MyView
by Andy McNab

“This was an isolated incident where the command and control structure completely broke down.

But don’t judge the rest of the Army on the behaviour of this bunch.

The Army is not a knitting club, we train our men to be aggressive, to fight and to kill.

Their lives depend on it. But that aggression must be controlled.

What happened here was the chain of command did not have a grip on it.

They lost control and the consequences were tragic. But it is an isolated incident. You have to welcome this report, no one is covering up.”

2011
22.07

The Sun
By John Kay, Chief Reporter
07 Jul 2011

The Ministry of Defence spends three times as much money helping top officers’ children attend elite private schools as it does compensating soldiers injured in Afghanistan.

(..) But the MoD – which faces severe cost-cutting measures – found cash to subsidise the children of more than 5,000 officers to attend top schools.

Go to the Sun to read the full article and find out what this is all about

myView
By ANDY McNAB

“The education allowance is a success story for all sorts of reasons. The Armed Forces remain one of the few places where ordinary people can really achieve social mobility through hard work.

This scheme is open to all ranks and it is money well spent on the children because they are getting a top-class education.

It is also money well spent on our servicemen and women who travel constantly for work.

If they take advantage of this, they stand to gain a great deal.”

2011
18.07

The ForceSelect Foundation is planning to embark on an epic road trip across the U.S. this month with notable UK rock stars including Luke Morley of legendary rock band Thunder and the Union to raise funds for small military charities across the UK.

Bestselling author and SAS hero Andy McNab and Brigadier Richard Dennis OBE, the British Army’s Director of Infantry, will form part of the ForceSelect team with Peter Shoulder of the Union, who won the WC Handy Award from the Blues Foundation of America, previously only won by Eric Clapton and Peter Green of Fleetwood Mac.

The road trip sets off from Cranbrook in Canada on July 11 and will take in the stunning scenery including Glacier National Park, thought to be one of the greatest rides in the US. It finishes six days and 1,000 miles later in Ketchum, USA, where there will be a concert to raise further charitable funds.

The ‘Great British Invasion’ concert, which will also raise funds for US and Canadian military charities, will entertain thousands of fans at the Sun Valley Pavilion with bands such as The Union, winners of Classic Rock Awards’ Best New Breakthrough Band 2010, Thunder and Marina V.

The ForceSelect Foundation, which is led by former Chief of the General Staff, General Sir Mike Jackson, raises funds from charity initiatives, corporate and individual donations and a percentage of the profits from leading recruitment consultancy and sister company, ForceSelect to support smaller military charities that are struggling for funding.

Andy McNab said: “I cannot wait to get on the Harley and drive off into the sunset. I’m a great fan of the film Easy Rider and it’s been an ambition of mine for some time to see Canada and the US from a bike. This will be a once in a lifetime experience and something I’m really looking forward to.”

Go here to read the full article