2011
05.02

2011
17.01

The Guardian
On the 20th anniversary of the start of the 1991 Gulf war, politicians, soldiers and a journalist look back
16 January 2011

Andy McNab is the pseudonym of a former member of the SAS and author of Bravo Two Zero, the story of a failed special forces mission. He received the distinguished conduct medal.

“My most vivid memory of the Gulf war is the morning of 24 January when the eight-man SAS patrol I was commanding, during a covert mission north-west of Baghdad, was compromised by a seven-year-old Iraqi boy. The boy was herding goats in the middle of the desert, and happened to pick out the one tiny wadi where our patrol planned to hide up until last light, and stumbled upon us. I remember his eyes grew wide as saucers in shock and fear. After a split second, he then ran off screaming and shouting, towards the Iraqi anti-aircraft gun crew stationed close by. This resulted in the deaths of three of our patrol members, with four more of us captured and tortured by the Iraqis. Only one patrol member escaped. Being captured and tortured has had a profound effect on the way I now conduct my life. I feel both lucky and guilty about being one of those that survived. But having come through the torture and the mock executions, I endeavour never to take life for granted, and always try to do my best to help others who have experienced war and are still suffering.”

For full article go to The Guardian

2010
12.12

The Sun’s Millies: “It’s so important to recognise the work everyone in services does.”

By Duncan Larcombe
10 December 2010

PRINCE CHARLES yesterday launched this year’s Sun Military Awards alongside Armed Forces top brass and a host of showbiz and sport stars.
Charles and wife Camilla hosted a tea party at Clarence House for the 12 Millies judges, who have the near-impossible task of picking out the bravest of the brave from thousands of nominations.

Andy McNab: “Every year The Sun’s Military Awards become more and more important because there is more and more activity in the military. This year we have lost 101 of our men in Afghanistan and we, as a nation, now have the chance to honour them.”

The star-studded ceremony will be screened on ITV1 at 9pm next Friday, December 17.

Read the full article here

The Sun's Millies 2010 judges.. Andy McNab on the left. Photo The Sun - Arthur Edwards

2010
07.12

The Sun: ‘SAS hit squads at UK’s malls’
By Anthony France, David Willetts and Duncan Larcombe
Published: 7 December 2010

SAS hit squads are today protecting packed shopping centres from terrorists – with orders to shoot to kill.
The regiment’s elite troops are poised to foil any al-Qaeda bid to cause Mumbai-style carnage amid Britain’s Christmas crowds.

The Who Dares Wins teams have instructions to strike hard and fast to combat the “real and credible” threat of a bomb-and-gun onslaught by fanatics.

Read the full article in The Sun here

‘Smart move… I feel safer’
Says ANDY McNAB

THE fact that an SAS squadron has been dispatched this week is no cause for alarm.

This is simply a case of the Regiment’s good planning and preparation.

Firstly, it makes sense to have an increased military presence around Christmas. This is a high-threat period just because of the number of people on the streets.

As we saw with the 7/7 terrorist attacks, the bombers chose to strike during rush hour because they knew that was when most commuters would be out and about. It’s the same with Christmas. The second sound reason for the Regiment to move is the recent spate of bad weather.

In war it is a normal pragmatic decision to move your troops forward if you know there is going to be bad weather. It’s just the same here. The Regiment are based in Hereford. So if they are required elsewhere, it makes sense that they are already in place.

Then they won’t have to deal with snow and ice, Christmas traffic and bad flying conditions to reach their destination. Any emergency service makes provision for bad weather and perceived threat – and the Regiment are no different.

I can remember moving to certain areas on standby many times during my ten years in the SAS. I, for one, feel safer when members of the Regiment are among us.

2010
06.12

90-day blitz takes out 3,200 Taliban
The Sun
By David Willetts, Defence Correspondent

Published: 01 Dec 2010

Secret strike operations led by British and American Special Forces have taken out 3,200 Taliban insurgents in just 90 DAYS.

The huge haul was achieved in an “autumn showdown” – launched to crush the Taliban before they skulk off for winter.

British SAS and SBS fighters, US Delta Force units, Afghan Special Forces Tiger Teams and elite outfits from other coalition troops hit the enemy relentlessly for three months.

Of the 3,200 killed or captured in covert strikes, 387 were top-level commanders. The figures were handed to SAS hero and Sun Security Adviser Andy McNab at a top level briefing in the Afghan capital Kabul. Andy visited the frontline this month to drum up support for the Sun’s Jobs for Heroes campaign – backed by expert recruitment firm ForceSelect.

He said: “We are nailing the Taliban. We are killing and capturing them on an industrial scale.

“This wasn’t a blanket approach to killing. These are tactical missions. Troopers are now specifically targeting the Taliban leadership, and those who fight FOR the Taliban.

“Our guys weren’t targeting those who simply fought WITH the Taliban. There is a clear distinction. Some are fighting because they need the money or too frightened not to. They are not fighting for hate or the ideology.

“Of course, some commanders worry that younger, more radical Taliban fighters will take the place of dead leaders.

“But, talking to the guys who conduct these covert operations, they weren’t unduly worried about it.

“If a new generation of radical Taliban step into these dead men’s shoes, they too will be killed or captured.”

The operations are part of the push towards a Nato handover of control in Afghanistan to Afghan National Forces and police by 2014.

Source: The Sun

Andy McNab in The Sun - meeting the troops

2010
04.12

Killing? It’s just a job for Andy McNab. The highly decorated soldier and best-selling author feels no fear; rather he enjoys the excitement of conflict. But is this physically powerful man actually an emotional coward? And is anyone brave enough to ask him?

Interview: Andy McNab, soldier and best-selling author
Published Date: 30 November 2010
By Catherine Deveney

ANDY McNab is the most affable, good-humoured man you could meet, which makes his absence of empathy all the more startling. The ex-SAS man, the most decorated soldier in the British Army since the Second World War, and now best-selling author of the Nick Stone thriller series, is sitting with a Diet Coke, agreeing he “couldn’t have cared less” the first time he killed a man.

What if someone got run over and killed in front of him? “Well, they’re dead, aren’t they? What’s the point in being upset?” Married five times, he talks with equal detachment about ex-wives. What does his fifth wife think of him? “That I’m a dickhead.” Thing is, he’s just been tested for an experiment at Cambridge university and the parts of his brain governing empathy and fear were both visibly underdeveloped.

How did he feel about that? “Great,” he says. We both laugh. Even the psychologist joked about it. “He said, ‘You don’t care do you?'” And McNab’s wife? “She just said, ‘I know’. She’s known for years. That’s why she says I’m a dickhead.”

Blue eyes … dark hair … the craggy side of handsome. Friendly and engaged. McNab is never photographed openly – nor does he use his real name – because of his intelligence background in Northern Ireland. But we meet in a London hotel and he talks fast, in a Cockney drawl, with the openness of a man who’s figured things out and doesn’t much care what others think. Clues to his extraordinary levels of detachment are all there in a complex life story, from his abandonment as a baby to his capture and torture in Iraq. There are clues in his books too. The man who entered the British army with a reading age of 11 has just published Zero Hour, the 13th Nick Stone novel. Stone, a tough, independent intelligence operative, is a largely autobiographical creation, McNab admits. It’s easier that way. He describes Stone as “an emotional dwarf”. But he also says he has the capacity to be “soft as shit”. Draw your own conclusions.

Go here to read the full interview in The Scotsman

Andy McNab in The Scotsman 2010