2008
06.11

An interview in The Telegraph – by Sarah Ewing.

The secretive and dangerous work of the Special Air Service (SAS) has been brought to the attention of a wider public by bestselling author Andy McNab. He was the most highly decorated serving soldier in the British Army when he left in 1993. He now lives on a farm in Middlesex with his daughter and wife, Jenny.

How did your childhood influence your attitude to money?
It had a huge impact on me. I was found abandoned in a carrier bag outside Guy’s Hospital in London in 1959, and was brought up by my foster parents, who later adopted me. They were decent working-class people, but money was always very tight, because they also adopted another boy and had their own young son. In the 1970s we relied on free school dinners and clothes vouchers. Money was always a concern.

Does being well off now make you feel happier?
No, not exactly. Many people believe the cliché “Money can’t buy you happiness”. But it does, you know. You don’t have to worry about things, like my mum and dad did, and whether you’ve got enough money in the bank to cover bills. However, I don’t travel first class out of principle – I go business class. I can’t see the point of spending an extra four grand.

Does talking about personal wealth embarrass you?
No. I’ve spent a lot of time in New York and people there are the complete opposite of Brits, where there’s almost an embarrassment about doing well for yourself and having money. In the early days when my writing career took off, there was a funny reaction amongst my friends; some were p****d off, some were happy for me.

Go here to read the full interview in The Telegraph

2008
06.11

Female First (also Male First) Helen Earnshaw interviewed Andy who’s ‘on tour’ promoting the release of the ‘Tour of Duty’ DVD.

Andy McNab is a British soldier, serving in the infantry as a Royal Green Jacket, joining the infantry at the age of sixteen and serving in Northern Ireland before being selected for the SAS.

In the SAS he served in the Middle East as well as Southern and Central America. He shot to prominence in 1993 when, after leaving the SAS, he wrote a book on the failed mission Bravo Two Zero, which told of the events that happened during the Gulf War.

Since then he has gone on to write a series of fiction and non fiction novels and has, more recently, been behind the documentary Tour of Duty which looked at the soldiers serving in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars. I caught up with him to talk about his new project.

You are promoting your DVD Tour of Duty can you tell me a bit about it?

“For the past three or four years all the stories that are coming out of Iraq and Afghanistan it’s always someone else telling the stories, so the idea is to get the guys that were involved in these things to talk about it themselves. Instead of me sitting there all day gobbing off about it, lets get these lads in as they know the story well, they are articulate and actually what happens is you get all the emotion and you can identify with them.”

Read the full interview here (2 pages!)

2008
04.07

Seven Troop on Amazon

2008
28.01

Patricia MacBride, sister of deceased IRA operative Tony McBride, has been appointed to serve as a Victims’ Commissioner in Northern Ireland.

Tony MacBride was one of the IRA members killed by Andy McNab and co. after attempting to detonate explosives outside a County Fermanagh restaurant on 2 December 1984. SAS soldier Lance Corporal Alistair Slater, from Leicestershire, was murdered by the IRA in the same gun battle, as documented in Immediate Action.

It seems to Grey Man’s Land that Slater’s family should be the ones speaking for victims, but oh, well.  No response from Andy yet on this appointment.