2016
27.10

Andy McNab in conversation with Hal Stewart on BFBS Radio
26 October 2016

Teaser clip interview with Hal Stewart above.

2015
16.01

Andy McNab talks about one of the most defining moments in any soldiers life.

2012
04.07

The Sun – 27 June 2012
A gesture too far?
Queen to shake hands with ex-IRA boss

THE QUEEN is today expected to shake hands with former IRA commander Martin McGuinness during her Diamond Jubilee tour of Northern Ireland.

The meeting with the Stormont Deputy First Minister is a milestone in Anglo-Irish relations. While many see it as strengthening peace, others – on both sides – find it unpalatable.
Here are two opposing views.

YES

By Andy McNab, ex-SAS in Northern Ireland

When the Queen shakes the hand of terrorist-turned-politician Martin McGuinness, it will still be dripping with the blood of more than 3,300 men, women and children killed by Irish terrorists.

That is over 300 murders more than al-Qaeda inflicted during the 9/11 attacks.

There must be reconciliation. Otherwise, the wounds of what politicians like to call “The Troubles” (it felt more like a bloody and grim war to me) will never heal.

That is already happening, at a speed no one dreamt of.

So before we go all cuddly over the fact that McGuinness is moving the peace process forward, think again.

This meeting has nothing to do with reconciliation but all to do with using the Queen to strengthen McGuinness and his party, Sinn Fein, across the whole of Ireland. McGuinness is soon to step down as a Westminster MP and plans to concentrate on Irish politics.

This meeting between him and the Queen will endorse him as a credible future leader of a united Ireland.

There wasn’t a single year in my 18 years of service in the infantry and SAS that I wasn’t involved in that dirty war fought in the shadows.

I had friends killed and injured and I’m not the only one who hasn’t forgotten. The families of those shot dead or blown to pieces on the streets of Belfast and Derry or in the bandit country of South Armagh haven’t.

More security forces were killed in combat year on year in Northern Ireland than Afghanistan, and the wounded still live with life-changing injuries.

This handshake is far too much, too soon, for many who experienced the so-called Troubles.

Go here for the full article and the NO by Michael Gallagher

 

2011
05.02

2010
11.08

“The Troubles have not returned, they just never went away”

Dissident republicans in Northern Ireland have stepped up a campaign of violence in the past week with four attempted bombings.
The attacks come more than a year after the murders of two soldiers at Massereene Barracks in Antrim and the killing of a cop in Lurgan.

Sun Security expert Andy McNab, who served in Ulster with the SAS during the Troubles, looks at why the fragile peace has been shattered.
 

By ANDY McNAB
Published: 11 August 2010

“No one should be surprised that a few extremists are trying to reignite a war in Northern Ireland. Whenever any conflict goes out of the public consciousness everyone thinks it is finished – but it never is.

In Ulster, warfare has been going on for hundreds of years and I can’t see it ever ending. Five-year-old kids in the street can quote you the dates of historic battles and why they were important. The demise of the Provisional IRA was largely due to the success of the SAS – “The Regiment” – in killing their active service units in the mid-1980s and early Nineties. But the guys who survived still believe passionately in a united Ireland.

They think the British are occupying Ulster and look upon the leading republicans such as Gerry Adams and Martin McGuinness, who are now in government, as traitors. As far as the dissidents are concerned, they sold out.”

Gripped
 
“Now there is a new generation being brought up with this ideology and the belligerence is stronger than it has been for decades. You only have to see the graffiti in Derry to know what is bubbling beneath the surface. The young yobs are being financed and they have access to sophisticated bomb-makers. There is poverty, unemployment and a lack of education, which feeds their anger.

The terrorists have always been a minority because the vast majority of the people just want to go to work and get their kids to school. But it is a dangerous minority. They have always been there and there has been trouble in Northern Ireland every 25 years or so for centuries. If this latest upsurge in violence is to be stopped from escalating like the Troubles of 1969 onwards did, then the problem has to be gripped now.

The Army cannot do it. It is reckoned that 25 per cent of all security services activity is still in Northern Ireland, and Special Forces have sent a recce group back in.
Some believe one of the reasons why the dissidents are stepping up their attacks is to try to get Army patrols back on the streets. They would love to point to “an army of occupation” to justify their cause. But it would be counter-productive for security forces to get heavy.

It is down to the community not to let it escalate. They have experienced peace now for the first time in two or three generations. If they want to keep it, they need to get a grip on the dissidents in their midst.”

Source: The Sun

2010
19.06

Wednesday 16 June

“Lord Saville’s inquiry into Bloody Sunday found that the Ulster massacre had no justification. John Kelly, the brother of Michael Kelly who was shot during the march at the age of 17 speaks to Charlie. Trevor Kavanagh also gives his opinion.

Gregory Campbell, DUP member for Londonderry, explains his view on the verdict.

The Sun’s Security Expert, Andy McNab says the report lacks context.”
 
Go here to listen to The Jon Gaunt Show – 16 June

Andy McNab’s item starts at 1h45min30