2011
08.07

The Sun
Harry ‘hunted and tortured’ in drill
Warrior Prince’s practice for being shot down

Published: 17 Jun 2011

PRINCE Harry will head back to war against the Taliban after SAS training that will see him hunted down – and TORTURED.
The Apache helicopter pilot, 26 – who The Sun revealed yesterday is returning to Afghanistan – faces three days of hell learning to cope with being shot down behind enemy lines.

Go here to read the full article in The Sun

myView
By Andy McNab
Sun Security Expert

If things go pear-shaped and Harry loses his aircraft he needs to become a soldier who is equally effective on the ground.

The “escape and evasion” training is rehearsed as realistically as possible.

When I did mine it was the hardest in my whole military career. But it prepares you for what’s coming – and make no mistake, Harry will be roughing it like the rest.

2011
05.02

2011
26.01

* EDIT 1 February: Unfortunately Andy won’t be able to make it to this event 🙁

Elite Forces Celebrity Speakers Day

Paul Lincoln, Gordon Stevens, Trevor Royle, Soldier I, Rusty Firmin, Andy McNab
7 May 2011, 10.15am – 7.00pm

Leading authors and soldiers are joining rank on Saturday 7 May to offer visitors an exclusive day of talks on the elite warriors of the Special Forces.

From their early beginnings in the Long Range Desert Group and the Chindits in the Second World War to the explosive emergence of the SAS during the Iranian embassy siege, Britain’s elite forces have always cut an adventurous, if secretive, dash.

Discover the inner workings of Britain’s most covert operational force with a series of individual talks at our Elite Forces Celebrity Speaker Day.

Speakers will appear in the following order with two breaks (at times to be confirmed).

•Paul Lincoln – The Long Range Desert Group
•Gordon Stevens – The Originals: The Secret History & Birth of the SAS
•Trevor Royle – Orde Wingate & The Chindits
•Soldier I – The Battle of Mirbat
•Rusty Firmin – Go! Go! Go!: The Iranian Embassy Siege
•Andy McNab – Bravo Two Zero

National Army Museum,
Royal Hospital Road,
Chelsea, London SW3 4HT

Tickets can be purchased in the following ways:
•Telephone: 020 7881 6600 (UK)
•Online: Use the booking form on this page or visit the Museum Shop
•At the Museum

A concessionary rate is available to SOFNAM members, students, seniors and service personnel.

Source: National Army Museum Thank you for sending this in Faith!

2011
17.01

The Guardian
On the 20th anniversary of the start of the 1991 Gulf war, politicians, soldiers and a journalist look back
16 January 2011

Andy McNab is the pseudonym of a former member of the SAS and author of Bravo Two Zero, the story of a failed special forces mission. He received the distinguished conduct medal.

“My most vivid memory of the Gulf war is the morning of 24 January when the eight-man SAS patrol I was commanding, during a covert mission north-west of Baghdad, was compromised by a seven-year-old Iraqi boy. The boy was herding goats in the middle of the desert, and happened to pick out the one tiny wadi where our patrol planned to hide up until last light, and stumbled upon us. I remember his eyes grew wide as saucers in shock and fear. After a split second, he then ran off screaming and shouting, towards the Iraqi anti-aircraft gun crew stationed close by. This resulted in the deaths of three of our patrol members, with four more of us captured and tortured by the Iraqis. Only one patrol member escaped. Being captured and tortured has had a profound effect on the way I now conduct my life. I feel both lucky and guilty about being one of those that survived. But having come through the torture and the mock executions, I endeavour never to take life for granted, and always try to do my best to help others who have experienced war and are still suffering.”

For full article go to The Guardian

2010
19.12

Andy was on Channel 4 tonight, a show called ‘100 Greatest Toys with Jonathan Ross’. Thank you for alerting us Ali!
I’m afraid I have to do with the screencap, ‘watch again’ is only for UK residents. Sigh.

The show:
‘Presented by gadget, gizmo and toy collector extraordinaire Jonathan Ross, 100 Greatest Toys with Jonathan Ross is a three-hour countdown of the nation’s favourite toys and games.

From Action Man to Yahtzee and from Barbie to Trivial Pursuit, inventors and toy-makers tell the inside stories of their creations and success. And to fully explain the impact of these toys and games, the children of yesteryear – today’s celebrities, authors, actors and journalists – reveal exactly what it was that made them love a particular toy.’

Watch the Jonathan Ross show on Channel 4 – UK residents only!

2010
07.12

The Sun: ‘SAS hit squads at UK’s malls’
By Anthony France, David Willetts and Duncan Larcombe
Published: 7 December 2010

SAS hit squads are today protecting packed shopping centres from terrorists – with orders to shoot to kill.
The regiment’s elite troops are poised to foil any al-Qaeda bid to cause Mumbai-style carnage amid Britain’s Christmas crowds.

The Who Dares Wins teams have instructions to strike hard and fast to combat the “real and credible” threat of a bomb-and-gun onslaught by fanatics.

Read the full article in The Sun here

‘Smart move… I feel safer’
Says ANDY McNAB

THE fact that an SAS squadron has been dispatched this week is no cause for alarm.

This is simply a case of the Regiment’s good planning and preparation.

Firstly, it makes sense to have an increased military presence around Christmas. This is a high-threat period just because of the number of people on the streets.

As we saw with the 7/7 terrorist attacks, the bombers chose to strike during rush hour because they knew that was when most commuters would be out and about. It’s the same with Christmas. The second sound reason for the Regiment to move is the recent spate of bad weather.

In war it is a normal pragmatic decision to move your troops forward if you know there is going to be bad weather. It’s just the same here. The Regiment are based in Hereford. So if they are required elsewhere, it makes sense that they are already in place.

Then they won’t have to deal with snow and ice, Christmas traffic and bad flying conditions to reach their destination. Any emergency service makes provision for bad weather and perceived threat – and the Regiment are no different.

I can remember moving to certain areas on standby many times during my ten years in the SAS. I, for one, feel safer when members of the Regiment are among us.