2016
27.10

Andy McNab in conversation with Hal Stewart on BFBS Radio
26 October 2016

Teaser clip interview with Hal Stewart above.

2013
13.03

January 1991 – can you remember what you were doing?

 Andy McNab can. It was the day his eight man patrol infiltrated deep behind enemy lines in Iraq. Their call sign: BRAVO TWO ZERO.

Now, twenty years on from the 1993 first publication of the bestselling account of this mission, Transworld publish a fully revised and updated commemorative edition, published on 23rd May.

‘Looking back I don’t regret a single thing we did during that time. I still believe we made the right decisions, tactically and morally, but what I knew about was soldiering, that and juvenile detention. I was 33 going on 17, and what’s changed now is that I am able to look at the whole picture objectively, how I felt then and feel now and how the experience of that January changed the lives of the whole patrol.’ ~Andy McNab

Product details:
Paperback: 416 pages
Publisher: Corgi (23 May 2013)
ISBN-10: 0552168823
ISBN-13: 978-0552168823

2012
10.02

MMA fighter and paratrooper Jack Marshman22-year-old serving Paratrooper and professional MMA fighter Jack Marshman will compete for the British Association of Mixed Martial Arts promotion’s World Middleweight Championship on 24th March at Birmingham’s National Indoor Arena.
Marshman, who will enter the ring with a perfect 10-0 record, will face champion Tom Watson, whose experience and superior technique will pose a formidable obstacle to the title-hungry soldier. However, as one would expect from a Para, Marshman is known for his toughness, tenacity, and indomitable will, and his growing legion of supporters believe he’s more than up for the challenge.
Andy McNab fans and all who support the forces should make sure not to miss this bout, as it promises to be not only a great fight but likely further proof that the men and women who serve have a fighting spirit worthy of a true champion.

2011
04.05

The Sun
By Simon Hughes, Virginia Wheeler, Dan Sales and Neil Millard
Published: 03 May 2011

Obama ‘watched him die’

The world’s most evil man was consigned to the dustbin of history yesterday – shot in the head, tied up in a weighted bag and dropped in the ocean.
Osama Bin Laden finally paid the price for atrocities such as 9/11 when he was found by US Special Forces at his luxury lair in Pakistan.

He was killed as he cowered behind his wife – and President Barack Obama watched live via cameras worn by the troops. The 54-year-old warlord was buried in the north Arabian sea, his terror reign over at last.

President Obama’s eyes were glued to a screen showing the dramatic moments leading to the death of Bin Laden.

Go here to read the full article in The Sun

Textbook op by naval elite

By Andy McNab
Ex SAS soldier

“As a military operation, the Navy Seals’ swoop was fantastic – textbook stuff.

It’s not surprising for a group made up of America’s military elite.

They undergo some of the toughest training in the world and have played an important role in the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan and also in Vietnam.

Clearly there has been a slow covert operation to make sure the information they were acting on was 100 per cent accurate.

In a situation like this intelligence is the biggest weapon of all. They probably used satellites and local informants to confirm Bin Laden was hiding out in the Abbottabad compound.”

2010
06.10

From Duncan Larcombe, Defence Editor, in Sangin
Published: 21 Sep 2010

The Sun stood shoulder to shoulder with our brave boys yesterday – as they finally said goodbye to the Valley of Death.
We were the last newspaper remaining as heroic commandos handed control of once lawless Sangin to the Americans.

In four bloody years wresting the powderkeg town and its district from the grip of the Taliban, more Brit troops have given their lives there than on any other front line in Afghanistan.

As our weary soldiers yesterday left with their heads held high they remembered the 105 comrades killed battling to put an end to the terrorists’ reign of fear and anarchy.

For some, there was frustration at a “job unfinished” – because of the failure to crush EVERY last insurgent bent on making life hell for the district’s long-suffering inhabitants.

Go here to read the full article in The Sun

MyView
By ANDY MCNAB

I AM fed up with armchair generals who say the handover of Sangin to US Forces is a British retreat.

That is 100 per cent crap. We have moved out because at long last the 20,000 US ‘boots on the ground’ finally arrived.

This is a tactical decision. The Brits’ job in Helmand is still to take on the Taliban and protect locals.

Now they can be more evenly deployed. What the Brits achieved in Sangin is stunning. We held ten square miles of dusty ground vital to the Taliban.

Sangin is near the poppy fields and heroin trade routes. Profits made in UK and US cities fund the Taliban. Holding that ground came at a massive cost. Troops have died, but not in vain. Handing Sangin to the Americans is not betraying our dead. They stopped the Taliban bringing in more weapons. They helped save the lives of their mates.

There is no greater sacrifice.

2010
11.08

“The Troubles have not returned, they just never went away”

Dissident republicans in Northern Ireland have stepped up a campaign of violence in the past week with four attempted bombings.
The attacks come more than a year after the murders of two soldiers at Massereene Barracks in Antrim and the killing of a cop in Lurgan.

Sun Security expert Andy McNab, who served in Ulster with the SAS during the Troubles, looks at why the fragile peace has been shattered.
 

By ANDY McNAB
Published: 11 August 2010

“No one should be surprised that a few extremists are trying to reignite a war in Northern Ireland. Whenever any conflict goes out of the public consciousness everyone thinks it is finished – but it never is.

In Ulster, warfare has been going on for hundreds of years and I can’t see it ever ending. Five-year-old kids in the street can quote you the dates of historic battles and why they were important. The demise of the Provisional IRA was largely due to the success of the SAS – “The Regiment” – in killing their active service units in the mid-1980s and early Nineties. But the guys who survived still believe passionately in a united Ireland.

They think the British are occupying Ulster and look upon the leading republicans such as Gerry Adams and Martin McGuinness, who are now in government, as traitors. As far as the dissidents are concerned, they sold out.”

Gripped
 
“Now there is a new generation being brought up with this ideology and the belligerence is stronger than it has been for decades. You only have to see the graffiti in Derry to know what is bubbling beneath the surface. The young yobs are being financed and they have access to sophisticated bomb-makers. There is poverty, unemployment and a lack of education, which feeds their anger.

The terrorists have always been a minority because the vast majority of the people just want to go to work and get their kids to school. But it is a dangerous minority. They have always been there and there has been trouble in Northern Ireland every 25 years or so for centuries. If this latest upsurge in violence is to be stopped from escalating like the Troubles of 1969 onwards did, then the problem has to be gripped now.

The Army cannot do it. It is reckoned that 25 per cent of all security services activity is still in Northern Ireland, and Special Forces have sent a recce group back in.
Some believe one of the reasons why the dissidents are stepping up their attacks is to try to get Army patrols back on the streets. They would love to point to “an army of occupation” to justify their cause. But it would be counter-productive for security forces to get heavy.

It is down to the community not to let it escalate. They have experienced peace now for the first time in two or three generations. If they want to keep it, they need to get a grip on the dissidents in their midst.”

Source: The Sun